What it’s like to be a Christian

Being a Christian school teacher, I worry about my students. I worry about our core values of Jesus Christ living in each of us. I worry about whether I am serving God and community…

What it's like to be a Christian

Being a Christian school teacher, I worry about my students. I worry about our core values of Jesus Christ living in each of us. I worry about whether I am serving God and community well by putting on a good face and maintaining an air of mirth. I worry about whether the students will view me as an honest guide and a faithful Christian.

While I am not by any means a fundamentalist, I am a firm believer in faith in Christ and other divine gifts. I firmly believe that all families should honor the teaching of Jesus Christ and that every child should have access to the arts. I am a firm believer in the commandment to love God and neighbor. I also believe strongly in the First Amendment and that our government should not be forced to promote anything other than authentic Christianity.

My students are in all this from my day one. My goal is to set a good example by modeling good behavior and speaking the truth. My goal is to hold students to high standards but never crush them. My goal is to serve them in all facets of my work from how they treat each other to how they treat me. As a Christian school teacher I often do not engage in the notion of what is right or what is wrong.

As a Catholic school teacher, I am most concerned with the way that I contribute my Christian value to the world and the way that this contributes to my students’ faith. As a Catholic teacher I am most concerned with the way that I contribute my Christian value to the world and the way that this contributes to my students’ faith. SEE MORE VIDEOS

My teaching philosophy comes from a Christian worldview. The Bible’s teaching is about God’s creation and one’s responsibility to live according to that created truth. The Bible teaches us that we are responsible for the way we treat one another, but that people do not inherently have the same standard of moral behavior. From what I have heard and seen, people’s moral behavior changes. Thus, it is ultimately God who sets this standard.

There are certain things that I cannot teach or say. There are certain principles that I would not want my students to get wrong. There are certain things that I cannot teach or say. So, my teaching philosophy is one that is based on truth and established principles in God’s created order. I think most teachers would agree that there are certain things that I cannot teach or say. So, my teaching philosophy is one that is based on truth and established principles in God’s created order.

This means that what I teach depends on what I believe is true and the church or group of people I lead. It also means that what I teach and the way that I teach it depends on my relationship with the group of people I lead and my upbringing. One of the things that I cannot teach is, for example, that the authority for whether someone dies as a result of a deadly car accident or whether someone dies as a result of natural causes rests with God alone. Teaching that truth is not my goal but rather my students’ goal. Teaching that something is true is a teaching, not an objective truth. For me, teaching a biblical truth is not teaching it for any self-serving reason; I simply want my students to recognize the truth and to get this message from the Bible because God himself wants this message for all of us. Teachings about private sexuality outside of the bounds of sexual morality are also not taught as an objective truth or for any self-serving reason; they are, instead, taught because I know that these teachings are a means to the end of teaching my students biblical truth.

My job and my teaching philosophy comes from the Christian worldview. It comes from the Good News that the children of God have been created in the image of God. It comes from the Gospel that Jesus Christ is Lord of both God and mankind and is the true authority for the laws of God and all that he does and says. It comes from the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John that God is love and all who love God as a result of the Gospel are loved.

This means that what I teach depends on what I believe is true and the way that this contributes to my students’ faith. It also means that what I teach depends on my relationship with the group of people I lead and my upbringing.

I also, however, know that the way that I teach is not an act of faith. I do not think that my students are listening to what I am teaching in and about their lives — God and life and things like behavior and family and exercise. My students are listening to what I believe is true and the way that it contributes to my teaching. Therefore, this has as much to do with me as it does with

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